SDSU’s Aztec Music Group hosts the second backyard concert

“AMG + Friends” doubles the size of their crowd for the last concert of the semester

AMG + Friends backyard concert series

Surella Shamon

Blank Space, a band created at SDSU, performs original songs in front of the crowd.

by Gwenyth Hoebing, Staff Writer

The Aztec Music Group (AMG) dominated the second event of their “AMG + Friends” backyard concert series. Online presale tickets were available for $5 and $7 at the door.

Located on Dorothy Drive, students reunited at the scenic backyard for an exciting evening filled with good music, food and friends. 

Vice President of AMG and senior studying communication, Aerin Schnaid recounted her reaction to the growth of this event.

“We honestly were in complete shock at how much it’s grown. We named the series ‘AMG + Friends’ because it was initially an idea to put forth our incredible student artists with all our friends in attendance. We are now proud to say the Aztec Music Group has over 300 friends willing to support our school’s live music scene. Since last semester’s show, we’ve doubled the amount of attendees,” Schnaid said. 

Schnaid also explained how AMG has worked hard to bounce back after the pandemic. The previous event showed the group how important it was for the community amidst the post-pandemic struggle. The group hired professionals to make their last event of the year a memorable one for AMG.

Five talented local groups hit the stage to perform. Honey Pot, a two-member band formed in San Diego, led the night with an acoustic set.

Supercool, an 11-member group, hit the stage next with their impressive debut performance. The group categorizes its genre as funk/soul/R&B and was formed at San Diego State University. Supercool blew away the audience with their amazing lead vocalists and instrumental additions including the saxophone and trombone. The group did multiple covers of popular songs such as “Fly As Me” and “Smokin Out The Window” by Bruno Mars and Anderson .Paak, as well as  “Valerie” by Amy Winehouse. 

Following Supercool, Blue Hour, a four-member band hyped the crowd with their indie rock tunes. 

Attendees joined to form a mosh and sing along to the band’s cover of “Doses and Mimosas” by Cherub. The band also covered songs such as “Everlong” by Foo Fighters and “Can I Call You Tonight” by Dayglow. At one point the group’s guitarist joined the pit as the crowd surrounded him for an epic guitar solo. 

Julian Salberg, a senior economics major and frontman of Blue Hour, gave insight as to why these events are community building for SDSU and the campus music scene. 

“There’s such a scene for music at SDSU now, so events like this bring it to light for students that might wanna be a part of it but didn’t know how to get involved before,” Salberg said. “Live music, in general, brings people together and is always a good time, so it’s cool to see people get really excited about it happening around campus.”

Due to some personal complications, the band Outside The Frame played a shortened set. As the sunset finally fell in the evening, the band covered “No One Knows” by Queens of the Stone Age, and “Sweet Dreams” by Eurythmics.

Blank Space was last to hit the stage with an unforgettable ending to the night. The band was created at SDSU and played a phenomenal set filled with original songs such as “Michigan” and “Blowing Smoke.” The band ended the set with a cover of “Creep” by Radiohead, with the crowd singing along in unity, not wanting the night to come to an end. 

 

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A post shared by Blank Space (@blankspaceband_)

As Schnaid concludes the end of her senior year at SDSU, she emphasized the importance of leaving her mark on a great club and unforgettable event.

“I feel so blessed to have worked alongside my president Tony Shar, to leave a tiny mark on the best club on campus with the semesterly backyard concert series,” Schnaid said. 

You can follow the Aztec Music Group’s Instagram page to stay updated on future events.

 

Editors’ Note: We corrected the spelling of the band Blank Space. The Daily Aztec regrets publishing the error.